Iran apologises for plane crash, blames human error and 'US adventurism

Meanwhile,Ukrainian Prime Minister Oleksiy Honcharuk said on Saturday that Ukraine would pay 200,000 hryvnia ($8,350) each to the families of those who died in a plane crash in Iran this week

 

Paris:

The Ukrainian plane crash earlier this week was caused by human error and "U.S. adventurism", Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said in a tweet on Saturday.

 

"A sad day. Preliminary conclusions of internal investigation by Armed Forces: Human error at time of crisis caused by U.S. adventurism led to disaster," Zarif wrote on Twitter. "Our profound regrets, apologies and condolences to our people, to the families of all victims, and to other affected nations."


Parties responsible for the error would be referred to a judicial department within the military and held accountable, said the Iranian military in a statement read on state TV.

 

The plane had flown close to a sensitive military site belonging to the elite Revolutionary Guards and was shot down unintentionally, said the statement.

 

All 176 people on board were killed in the crash. The Iranian military statement expressed condolences to the families of the victims.

 

The United States and Canada had said that the plane was shot down, a claim Iran had initially denied.


Meanwhile,Ukrainian Prime Minister Oleksiy Honcharuk said on Saturday that Ukraine would pay 200,000 hryvnia ($8,350) each to the families of those who died in a plane crash in Iran this week.


He said Ukraine International Airlines would make payments to the families of the crew members who died in the crash. The airline’s spokeswoman was not immediately available for comment. Honcharuk also said Ukrainian diplomats were working on how to receive compensation from the Iranian authorities.

 

Dozens of passengers boarded the flight with Canadian passports and a total of 138 were heading to Canada. Claims for financial compensation are governed by international treaties, and both Canada and Ukraine have adopted the Montreal Convention. Mr. Fiorante said Iran still operates under the much older Warsaw Convention, which has lower limits on payouts.

 

Under the Montreal Convention, an airline is required to pay whatever damages a victim’s family can prove – which can vary based on the age and financial situation of each person – without any discussion of fault, up to a maximum of about $230,000. If the family can prove damages above that amount, the airline is required to pay the additional amount unless it can prove that it was not negligent.


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