Indonesian divers retrieve flight recorder from Jet crash

The black boxes will provide more information on what caused the plane to plunge more than 10,000 feet in a matter of seconds. Both pilots in command of Sriwijaya Air Flight 182 were experienced and the airline has a solid safety record, with no fatal accidents since it was founded in 2003. The 737-500 model itself also has a good safety record.

 

Indonesian Navy divers retrieved one of the black boxes of the Sriwijaya Air Boeing Co. jet that plunged into the Java Sea shortly after takeoff from Jakarta on Saturday afternoon, a key step in discovering what caused the aircraft carrying 62 people to crash.

Black boxes are crucial to understanding what happened as they capture sound in the cockpit and monitor flight data. The aircraft in this instance was a nearly 27-year-old Boeing 737-500, not the much newer 737 Max just emerging from a 20-month grounding. It was banned globally after two crashes, including a Lion Air flight in October 2018 that also plummeted into Indonesia’s Java Sea.Search teams retrieved the flight data recorder on Tuesday and are seeking to get the other box soon, military chief Hadi Tjahjanto said in a press briefing. Their locator beacons were detected soon after the crash, and efforts to collect the flight recorders were hampered by muddy waters and debris from the jet scattered in the sea.

The beacons on both boxes were dislodged due to the force of the impact.

Indonesia is one of the world’s fastest-growing aviation markets, but also has one of the worst safety records. The country’s planes were barred by the European Union in 2007 over safety concerns. The ban wasn’t fully lifted until 2018.

The black boxes will provide more information on what caused the plane to plunge more than 10,000 feet in a matter of seconds. Both pilots in command of Sriwijaya Air Flight 182 were experienced and the airline has a solid safety record, with no fatal accidents since it was founded in 2003. The 737-500 model itself also has a good safety record.

Representatives from Boeing and the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board will leave for Jakarta this week to help with the investigation, a person familiar with the matter said, asking not to be named because the matter is private. The Indonesian government has granted them a waiver to enter the country during its coronavirus-related travel ban.


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